You don't have to face advanced prostate cancer alone

A medical diagnosis can feel very solitary, but in truth, there is more support around you than you may think. Support groups can be a great source of inspiration and place to exchange feelings and ideas. Your healthcare team may also have additional resources that can help during treatment, so be sure to ask them.

Friends and family may also want to help in any way they can. Don't feel embarrassed or shy about accepting support from who offer it. Receiving help from people who care about you can help keep you going during difficult times

Support groups2,3

Support groups for prostate cancer give you the opportunity to talk and spend time with men who share similar experiences and understand firsthand what you’re going through. While you may have never thought about joining a group before, a prostate cancer support group can offer you.

          •  A chance to talk about your disease and ask questions 

          •  Help coping with advanced prostate cancer, such as how to share news 

              of your disease with others

          •  A supportive environment to recognize milestones in treatment

          •  Help dealing with practical problems, such as getting to and from doctor visits 

Types of support groups

 

IN-PERSON SUPPORT GROUPS

You may find that attending a support group in person is right for you. Ask your healthcare team if they know of any support groups in your area, or try calling local hospitals or treatment centers. 

 

Finding a group that’s right for you3

Joining a support group for prostate cancer may seem a little intimidating at first. It’s important to find a group that fits with your individual goals and preferences. The National Cancer Institute recommends that prior to joining a prostate cancer support group, you ask the group's contact person a few simple questions. That way, you can better understand the purpose of the group and whether it will be a good fit for you.

Possible questions to ask:

 

  • How large is the group?

  • Who attends (supervisors, family members, others)?

  • Is it specifically for prostate cancer patients?

  • What is the age range?

  • How long are the meetings?

  • How often does the group meet?

 

 

  • How long has the group been together?

  • Who leads the group?

  • What is the format of the meetings?

  • Is the main purpose to share feelings, or do people also offer tips to solve common problems?

Explore these helpful online resources

There is a lot to know about prostate cancer. Fortunately, there is a lot of information available for you right online. The following websites provide information about prostate cancer, advanced prostate cancer research, treatment options, education, rehabilitation, advocacy groups, local prostate cancer support groups, and more.

American Urological Association Foundation

www.urologyhealth.org

1-800-828-7866

The AUA Foundation is the world's leading nonprofit urological health foundation—and the official foundation of the American Urological Association. They partner with physicians, researchers, healthcare professionals, patients, caregivers, families, and the public to support and improve the prevention, detection, and treatment of urological diseases.

Men’s Health Network

www.menshealthnetwork.org

1-202-543-6461 ext.101

Men's Health Network (MHN) is a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to reach men and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health prevention messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation.

National Cancer Institute

www.cancer.gov

1-800-422-6237

This useful gateway into the National Cancer Institute allows users to access a portion of the contents of PDQ— the Physician Data Query database. With detailed information about specific cancers, PDQ is written for both medical professionals and patients.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network

www.nccn.com

1-215-690-0300

NCCN is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of cancer care. This not-for-profit organization is made up of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers. The network develops treatment guidelines, including the NCCN National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN) Guidelines for Patients™: Prostate Cancer, which you can find on the site.

Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI)

www.prostate-cancer.org

1-800-641-7274

PCRI is a charitable not-for-profit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of men’s lives by supporting research and disseminating information that educates and empowers patients, families, and the medical community.

Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF)

www.pcf.org

1-800-757-2873

PCF, an organization dedicated to finding a cure for prostate cancer, is the largest private source for research funding for prostate cancer. It offers information on prostate cancer, treatment options, and clinical trials, and personal stories of survival.

The Prostate Health Education Network (PHEN)

www.prostatehealthed.org

1-781-487-2239

PHEN's primary mission is to increase prostate health education and awareness. PHEN's working philosophy is that “knowledge is the best defense against prostate cancer.” The organization focuses on men at the highest risk for prostate cancer in the United States.

Prostate Conditions Education Council (PCEC)

www.prostateconditions.org

1-866-477-6788

A national organization committed to men’s health, PCEC is the nation’s leading resource for information on prostate health.

Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network

www.ustoo.org

1-630-795-1002

Us TOO helps survivors of prostate cancer and prostate disease and their families foster a positive mental outlook. This organization offers fellowship, shared counseling, and discussion sessions in both formal and informal settings.

ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer

www.zerocancer.org

1-202-463-9455

Known as the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer, ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action.

How LUPRON DEPOT works

While LUPRON DEPOT is not a cure. It has been used to manage advanced prostate cancer for over 25 years

Getting started on treatment

Learn what to expect from treatment with LUPRON DEPOT, and get some tips for a better treatment experience

Learn more about insurance coverage and financial aid programs

Most private insurance plans and Medicare cover LUPRON DEPOT therapy

Use 1

  • LUPRON DEPOT® (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) 7.5 mg for 1-month, 22.5 mg for 3-month, 30 mg for 4-month, and 45 mg for 6-month administration are prescribed for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer.
  • LUPRON DEPOT is a prescription medication that must be administered in your doctor’s office.

Important Safety Information1

  • LUPRON DEPOT is not for people who have had any type of allergic reaction to LUPRON DEPOT or similar drugs.
  • LUPRON DEPOT causes an increase in testosterone during the first few weeks of therapy.
    • – Some men may experience temporary new or worsening symptoms of prostate cancer, including urinary symptoms and/or bone      pain.
    • – If your cancer has spread to the spine or urinary tract, urinary blockage or pressure on the spine may occur and can sometimes lead to paralysis, which may be life-threatening.
    • – You may require close medical attention during the first few weeks of therapy. Notify your doctor if you develop any new or worsened symptoms after beginning LUPRON DEPOT treatment.
  • High blood sugar and increased risk of diabetes can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Your doctor will monitor your blood sugar during treatment.
  • Increased risk of heart attack, sudden death, and stroke can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Discuss this increased risk with your doctor before starting treatment and report any new symptoms during treatment.
  • LUPRON DEPOT can affect the electrical activity of your heart. Your doctor must determine if the benefits of using LUPRON DEPOT outweigh the risks, especially if you have congenital long QT syndrome, abnormal blood tests for electrolytes, congestive heart failure, or if you take medications to regulate your heartbeat.
  • Convulsions have been observed in patients taking leuprolide acetate, including patients who have a history of seizures, epilepsy, or brain disorders (related to blood vessels, nerves, or tumors), and in those taking medications associated with convulsions. Convulsions have also been reported in patients without any of these conditions.
  • Regular blood tests are needed to check your testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels.
  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause fetal harm if administered to a pregnant woman.
  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause impotence.
  • The most common side effects of LUPRON DEPOT include hot flashes/sweats; injection site reaction/pain; general pain; swelling; testicular shrinkage; difficulty urinating; fatigue/weakness; headache; and joint, gastrointestinal, and respiratory problems.

For more information, talk with your healthcare provider.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call
1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

US-LUPR-181868

Please click here for Full Prescribing information.

123456

References: 1. LUPRON DEPOT® [package insert]. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc. 2. National Cancer Institute. When someone you love has advanced cancer. NIH Publication No. 12-5757. Available at https://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/When-Someone-You-Love-Has-Advanced-Cancer.pdf. Accessed March 14, 2018._ 3. National Cancer Institute. Facing forward: life after cancer treatment. NIH Publication No. 14-2424. Available at https://www.cancer.gov/_publications/patient-education/life-after-treatment.pdf. Accessed March 14, 2018. 4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Orange Book detail search. Available at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/ob/search_produt.cfm. Accessed March 14, 2014.

US-LUPR-181818

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION1

  • LUPRON DEPOT® (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) is not for people who have had any type of allergic reaction to LUPRON DEPOT or similar drugs.

  • LUPRON DEPOT causes an increase in testosterone during the first few weeks of therapy.

    • – Some men may experience temporary new or worsening symptoms of prostate cancer, including urinary symptoms and/or bone pain.
    • – If your cancer has spread to the spine or urinary tract, urinary blockage or pressure on the spine may occur and can sometimes lead to paralysis, which may be life-threatening.
    • – You may require close medical attention during the first few weeks of therapy. Notify your doctor if you develop any new or worsened symptoms after beginning LUPRON DEPOT treatment.
  • High blood sugar and increased risk of diabetes can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Your doctor will monitor your blood sugar during treatment.

  • Increased risk of heart attack, sudden death, and stroke can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Discuss this increased risk with your doctor before starting treatment and report any new symptoms during treatment.

  • LUPRON DEPOT can affect the electrical activity of your heart. Your doctor must determine if the benefits of using LUPRON DEPOT outweigh the risks, especially if you have congenital long QT syndrome, abnormal blood tests for electrolytes, congestive heart failure, or if you take medications to regulate your heartbeat.

  • Convulsions have been observed in patients taking leuprolide acetate, including patients who have a history of seizures, epilepsy, or brain disorders (related to blood vessels, nerves, or tumors), and in those taking medications associated with convulsions. Convulsions have also been reported in patients without any of these conditions.

  • Regular blood tests are needed to check your testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels.

  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause fetal harm if administered to a pregnant woman.

  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause impotence.

  • The most common side effects of LUPRON DEPOT include hot flashes/sweats; injection site reaction/pain; general pain; swelling; testicular shrinkage; difficulty urinating; fatigue/weakness; headache; and joint, gastrointestinal, and respiratory problems.

For more information, talk with your healthcare provider.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call
1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

Please click here for Full Prescribing information.

 

USE1

  • LUPRON DEPOT 7.5 mg for 1-month, 22.5 mg for 3-month, 30 mg for 4-month, and 45 mg for 6-month administration are prescribed for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  • LUPRON DEPOT is a prescription medication that must be administered in your doctor’s office.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION1

LUPRON DEPOT® (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) is not for people who have had any type of allergic reaction to LUPRON DEPOT or similar drugs. LUPRON DEPOT causes an increase in testosterone during the first few weeks of therapy. Some men may experience temporary new or worsening symptoms of prostate cancer, including urinary symptoms and/or bone pain. If your cancer has spread to 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION1

  • LUPRON DEPOT is not for people who have had any type of allergic reaction to LUPRON DEPOT or similar drugs.
  • LUPRON DEPOT causes an increase in testosterone during the first few weeks of therapy.
    • –Some men may experience temporary new or worsening symptoms of prostate cancer, including urinary symptoms and/or bone      pain.
    • – If your cancer has spread to the spine or urinary tract, urinary blockage or pressure on the spine may occur and can sometimes lead to paralysis, which may be life-threatening.
    • – You may require close medical attention during the first few weeks of therapy. Notify your doctor if you develop any new or worsened symptoms after beginning LUPRON DEPOT treatment.
  • High blood sugar and increased risk of diabetes can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Your doctor will monitor your blood sugar during treatment.
  • Increased risk of heart attack, sudden death, and stroke can occur in men using LUPRON DEPOT. Discuss this increased risk with your doctor before starting treatment and report any new symptoms during treatment.
  • LUPRON DEPOT can affect the electrical activity of your heart. Your doctor must determine if the benefits of using LUPRON DEPOT outweigh the risks, especially if you have congenital long QT syndrome, abnormal blood tests for electrolytes, congestive heart failure, or if you take medications to regulate your heartbeat.
  • Convulsions have been observed in patients taking leuprolide acetate, including patients who have a history of seizures, epilepsy, or brain disorders (related to blood vessels, nerves, or tumors), and in those taking medications associated with convulsions. Convulsions have also been reported in patients without any of these conditions.
  • Regular blood tests are needed to check your testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels.
  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause fetal harm if administered to a pregnant woman.
  • LUPRON DEPOT may cause impotence.
  • The most common side effects of LUPRON DEPOT include hot flashes/sweats; injection site reaction/pain; general pain; swelling; testicular shrinkage; difficulty urinating; fatigue/weakness; headache; and joint, gastrointestinal, and respiratory problems.

For more information, talk with your healthcare provider.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call
1-800-FDA-1088.

If you cannot afford your medication, contact www.pparx.org for assistance.

US-LUPR-181868

Please click here for Full Prescribing information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION1

LUPRON DEPOT® (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) is not for people who have had any type of allergic reaction to LUPRON DEPOT or similar drugs. LUPRON DEPOT causes an increase in testosterone during the first few weeks of therapy.

Loading...